Resources for Drought Management

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Retrieved: September 18, 2021, 5:49 pm


dry dugout in Canadian pasture
Recurring drought is a natural part of the climate in many areas of Canada and creates a challenge when managing grazing and forage resources. Although droughts are often unpredictable, they are inevitable, meaning they are often at the back of every producer’s mind. Long-term farm and ranch management must include planning for and consideration of how drought will affect the entire system – including plants, livestock and water sources.

Eight tips for drought management

    • When managing through a drought, consider combining groups of animals to encourage grazing of less desirable plants and grazing pastures with species that are more tolerant of increased grazing pressure. It is important to monitor for toxic or poisonous plants, which are more likely to be grazed during dry years.
    • Sources of water for grazing animals can quickly become limited or unavailable during drought periods. It is recommended that any pastures that could possibly run out of water be grazed first. In some cases, it may become necessary to use a portable stock water supply in order to continue grazing a forage source where water has become limited.
    • Producers should consider pumping water from the source to a trough to help extend water supplies, maintain water quality and prevent cattle from getting stuck in watering sites that are drying up.
    • Stock water quality can deteriorate rapidly. Even if water quantity appears adequate, poor water quality can quickly cause health and production problems and even death. Test stock water sources frequently when animals are grazing.
    • Extended rest periods and increased recovery times are necessary to protect plants during dry periods.
    • Consider planting annual crops, supplementing pastures with alternate feeds, or creep feeding, to help extend grazing resources. Feed testing is an important consideration during dry conditions.
    • Drought management strategies should be a permanent part of every grazing plan. The benefits of rotational grazing and managing pastures to retain litter (plant residue) are especially evident during drought.
    • Drought plans should identify the order of groups or classes of livestock to be de-stocked, if necessary, and at what point each group will be moved if the drought persists.

Resources

Following are some current drought management resources available for beef producers.

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