Feeding Decisions Are Important Breeding Decisions

This article written by Dr. Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director, originally appeared in the December 2021 issue of Canadian Cattlemen magazine and is reprinted on the BCRC Blog with permission of the publisher.

When life gets really stressful it can be hard to remember what you already know. This column probably won’t tell you anything new, but it might remind you of some important principles that can get overlooked in the scramble to buy feed and make important financial decisions.
Black Angus cattle eating hay as winter feed
Winter feed costs are a key financial make-or-break factor for cow-calf producers, especially this winter. Weaned calf sales bear most of the responsibility for offsetting those winter feed costs, so reproductive performance is another financial make-or-break factor. The most profitable cows are those that wean a calf every year for the greatest number of years.

The big challenge is that feed costs and reproductive performance are inseparable. Drastic measures to minimize per head feed costs usually have a negative impact on reproductive performance. Maximizing reproductive performance can increase feed costs significantly. But there can be some room to move in the middle. Maintaining or even improving reproductive performance can often be achieved by carefully managing the feed you have to maintain optimal body condition scores. This may mean spending money differently, not necessarily more of it, and will help maintain or improve reproductive performance. Continue reading

What a Year — Top 10 Articles from the BCRC Blog in 2021


top 10 blog posts of 2021

This past year presented Canadian beef producers with a lot of different circumstances. Some challenges, such as a widespread drought, required responsive decision-making at times. Yet production cycles continue, and breeding, weaning and feeding activities need to be planned and prepared for. 

Throughout the year, the BCRC published blog posts once or twice a week. Articles provide science-based insight into issues impacting Canada’s beef sector. Some articles from the past year featured producers’ perspectives and tips on topics such as animal-handling or how to improve forages. Other articles featured calculators and tools designed to help beef producers make strategic decisions. Some featured new research, while others focus on a timely response to on-the-ground challenges. 

The BCRC strives to provide relevant science and economic-based information to producers throughout the year and we value the feedback of our audience. Which posts stood out for you? What are some topics you would like to see as we flip the calendar to a new year?

Below are the BCRC’s Top 10 blog posts of 2021.   
Canadian beef cattle during drought in pasture with dwindling water supply
10. Decision Making During Drought

Dealing with drought is hard, but there are some strategies producers can use to help them make the best of a tough situation. Marketing cull cows earlier than normal, drylotting cows or weaning calves earlier can reduce pressure on feed and pastures.  Continue reading

*UPCOMING WEBINAR* Setting Records- Calving Season Data Collection Jan 12th



While calving is one of the busiest times of the production cycle for cow-calf producers, there’s a lot of important information that can be collected. Which data is the most important to help you make critical decisions on your operation? This presentation will discuss the records that are worth spending valuable time collecting at calving.

Register for our upcoming webinar on January 12th and hear from a veterinarian from the University of Calgary as well as a producer sharing their practical perspective. The speakers will  share  insight and answer your questions about data collection at calving and how to make the best decisions for your operation!

This webinar also qualifies for 1 continuing education (CE) credit for registered veterinary technologists and technicians. A total of 3 CE credits will be available over the course of the BCRC 2021-22 webinar series. For more information on CE accreditation for RVT’s and veterinarians, please contact Dana Parker (parkerd@beefresearch.ca)

Continue reading

Attn Researchers – Genome Alberta and RDAR soliciting Statements of Interest

Genome Alberta is supporting Results Driven Agriculture Research (RDAR) in identifying innovative projects capable of advancing the application of genomics technology (including other -omics and bioinformatics) for the benefit of Alberta’s agriculture & agri-food sectors.

Up to $750 K per year is available with a 1:1 co-funding requirement from eligible sources. Projects must have a direct impact on Alberta’s agricultural industry (e.g., livestock, crops, food safety), addressing priority areas including but not limited to:

  • enhance productivity, profitability and competitiveness;
  • sustainable and responsible agricultural production; and
  • addressing market demands

More details about this funding opportunity, including the Statement of Interest Form and Terms and Conditions for the RDAR Accelerating Agricultural Innovations Program, are available on the Genome Alberta website.

Interested parties should submit their completed Statement of Interest Form to Ryan Mercer no later than 11:59 pm on January 2nd, 2022. 

Genome Alberta is hosting an information session webinar for this funding opportunity on Wednesday, December 8, 2021 at 10 am MST. Additional context will be provided and some common questions for prospective applicants will be addressed. Register here!

When seeking funding, researchers are encouraged to refer to the priorities and target research outcomes in the Canadian Beef Research and Technology Transfer Strategy.

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The sharing or reprinting of BCRC Blog articles is welcome and encouraged. Please provide acknowledgement to the Beef Cattle Research Council, list the website address, www.BeefResearch.ca, and let us know you chose to share the article by emailing us at info@beefresearch.ca.

 

We welcome your questions, comments and suggestions. Contact us directly or generate public discussion by posting your thoughts below.

Be Mindful of Minerals

What mineral supplementation do I need and when do I need it?

Beef producers might know they should supplement their herds with mineral, but trying to wade through all the choices at the livestock supply store can be overwhelming. Commercial suppliers seem to make claims and offer something different, but with tubs and bags of every colour and price available, how to you know which one is right for your herd? What minerals do your cattle actually need and how is it best delivered?

total mixed feed ration for beef cattle


In general, beef cattle producers should be supplementing mineral to their herds whether they are grazing or being fed a winter ration.

Megan Van Schaik, a Beef Cattle Specialist with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) says there are some key things producers want to look at. In general, producers should be supplementing mineral to their herds whether they are grazing or being fed a winter ration.

Van Schaik says there are a host of variables that impact mineral nutrition and deficiencies in beef herds. “They present in many different ways and alarm bells usually go off when we see reproductive issues,” she says, but adds that mineral status can be linked to general health problems and even calf abnormalities. Mineral deficiencies can also cause less obvious production losses that can be easily avoided with proper supplementation. Continue reading