Replacement heifers – Money, management, and momentum


Photo submitted by Brian Truema

Do you raise your own heifers? Or do you prefer to purchase your replacements? Regardless of your choice, developing heifers costs money and requires careful management.

Ideally, replacement heifers will go on to become long-term producers in the herd sothoughtful selection is critical. “Each producer has different resources and goals when they make the decision of whether they want to buy or retain heifers,” said Kathy Larson, a University of Saskatchewan economist. “Part of that decision needs to involve cost of production,” she advised during a recent BCRC webinar.

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On-Farm Antimicrobial Surveillance Moves a Step Closer

This article written by Dr. Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director, originally appeared in the September 2019 issue of Canadian Cattlemen magazine and is reprinted on the BCRC Blog with permission of the publisher.

As long as cattle continue to get sick, cattle producers will need antimicrobials to help them recover. At the same time, it’s common to hear activists, regulators, consumers and/or retailers call for livestock producers to stop using antimicrobials altogether, reduce antimicrobial use, or demonstrate that antimicrobials are being used responsibly. Solid, reliable data demonstrating our industry’s antimicrobial use (AMU) practices and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) prevalence on an ongoing basis are key to maintaining consumer and public confidence in Canadian beef production practices.

The Public Health Agency of Canada monitors antimicrobial resistance in healthy beef cattle, pigs and poultry arriving at abattoirs as well as retail meat through the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS). CIPARS has also had on-farm programs to collect antimicrobial use (AMU) and resistance (AMR) data for poultry and grower-finisher swine for several years. Continue reading

Government of Saskatchewan 2019 Strategic Research Initiative call for proposals

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture invites collaborative, multi-disciplinary,
cross-institutional Saskatchewan-based teams to develop and submit integrated research proposals that will contribute to the production, management and sustainability of Saskatchewan’s beef industry, pasture and rangeland resources under the diverse
environmental conditions across Saskatchewan.

The goal of the 2019 Strategic Research Initiative is to gather and synthesize knowledge from complementary areas – such as forage breeding, forage management, grazing and livestock management, environmental sustainability and agricultural economics – to develop and refine production advice to improve the productivity, sustainability and competitiveness of Saskatchewan’s forage/beef sector.

Completed applications are due by October 15, 2019.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with Jeff Braidek throughout the development of their proposal. We anticipate that early discussions will help to ensure a strong alignment between the proposed projects and the goals of the program.

Applications must be completed and submitted through the Agriculture Research Branch on-line application system.

To access the application web pages please either Login or create an account (Register) on the following website: https://arb.gov.sk.ca/. Once logged in, please select the Special Projects tab where you will find the Strategic Research Initiative application. Once an application has been created, it can be edited and submitted under this same tab. Should you require any assistance during the application process, please contact Mackenzie Hladun, Database Coordinator with the Ag Research Branch, at Mackenzie.hladun@gov.sk.ca (306-787-5929).

When seeking funding, researchers are encouraged to refer to the priorities and target research outcomes in the Canadian Beef Research and Technology Transfer Strategy.