Nominate an outstanding researcher by May 1

awardThe Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation is presented by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) each year to recognize a researcher or scientist whose work has contributed to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry.

Nominations are welcome from all stakeholders of the Canadian beef industry and will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of beef producers, industry experts and retired beef-related researchers located across the country.

Nominations will be kept on file and re-considered for up to two additional years. In such cases, the nominator will be contacted each year and given the opportunity to revise the nomination.

To be eligible, nominees must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants actively involved in research of benefit to the Canadian beef industry within the past 5 years. Benefit to the industry must be evident in a strong research program aligned with industry priorities, a demonstrated passion and long-term commitment through leadership, teamwork, and mentorship, involvement in ongoing education and training (where applicable), and active engagement with industry stakeholders.

Nominations for the 2017 award will be accepted until May 1, 2017.

The 2017 award will be presented at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference in August.

Past recipients of the Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation are:

Learn more and find the nomination form at http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/award.cfm

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The sharing or reprinting of BCRC Blog articles is welcome and encouraged. Please provide acknowledgement to the Beef Cattle Research Council, list the website address, www.BeefResearch.ca, and let us know you chose to share the article by emailing us at info@beefresearch.ca.

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Cover Crops

CoverCrop1Cover crops are typically diverse, annual crop mixtures planted with the intent to build and improve the soil. Cover crops may also include biennial or perennial species, depending on the end-use and goals of the producer. Cover crops may be grazed, baled, or used for silage, depending on the species that are seeded. Cover crops may also be used as a green manure or plough-down crop.

Cover crops, often called “cocktails,” consist of plants that will benefit the soil ecosystem and support a variety of soil microbes, fungi, and other biodiversity, such as earth worms. Cover crops can enable soils to have improved water infiltration, increased organic matter, and more efficient nutrient recycling. Some cocktail crop species may be useful in utilizing excess water in a field that would otherwise be water logged, while other species may be selected for their drought-tolerant qualities and their ability to make the most efficient use of existing moisture.

Click to continue reading about cover crops including information on mixtures and animal considerations… 

 
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Managing internal parasites: Webinar March 28

clickheretoregisterInternal parasites are a serious cost to the Canadian beef industry. In this webinar, Dr. Gilleard will discuss current issues in parasite management including how to achieve sustainable control as parasites become more resistant to available treatments.

When
14_cw_IMG_1404Tuesday March 28,  7:00 pm MT

  • 6:00pm in BC
  • 7:00pm in AB and SK
  • 8:00pm in MB
  • 9:00pm in ON and QC
  • 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI 

Interested but aren’t available that evening?
Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too.

Find and register for more BCRC webinars here, including:

  • Bovine TB: understanding the disease and how it is managed in Canada – March 2, 2017
  • Managing native forages – April 6, 2017

Continue reading

Today is Canada’s Agriculture Day

agdayLet’s celebrate the food we love and those who produce it!

As a Canadian beef producer, today is an excellent opportunity to share how you work hard to responsibly produce a quality product for your family and families all across Canada.

Beef producers are able to efficiently produce nutrient rich food that is enjoyed by so many Canadians through the use of science and technologies on farm. For example, in the 1950’s cattle needed to consume 10 pounds of feed in order to gain one pound. Today that ratio is only 6:1 with the use of safe technologies. That means more pounds of beef can be produced from fewer resources.

Many advancements in efficiency, beef quality, animal health and welfare, antimicrobial stewardship, and environmental sustainability are made possible with research, which is funded in part by a portion of the Canada’s Beef Cattle Check-off paid by cattle producers across the country.

Let’s sing the praises of our progressive and practical industry – a global leader in supplying healthy, high quality beef, cattle and genetics.

To help you celebrate Canada’s Agriculture Day, we have Continue reading

Deciding What Research and Innovation to Fund

This article written by Dr. Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director, originally appeared in the February 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen magazine and is reprinted on the BCRC Blog with permission of the publisher.

picThis column usually features Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) projects supported by Canada’s national check-off, mainly through Canada’s Beef Science Cluster. The current Beef Cluster involves the BCRC, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Alberta Beef Producers, the Alberta Cattle Feeders Association, Manitoba Beef Producers, Beef Farmers of Ontario, the Quebec Beef Producers Federation, DuPont Pioneer, the Grey Wooded Forage Association, and provincial government funds from Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario. By pooling resources and coordinating funding decisions, funders can avoid duplication and increase the odds that more good projects will go ahead. The Beef Cluster allows Canada’s beef industry to support much more and better research than we could in the past with limited national check-off dollars alone. The BCRC is now deciding which new projects to fund through the next Beef Cluster (2018-2023), so this month I explain how the BCRC decides what research to fund.

The first step is Continue reading

Young researchers encouraged to apply for CYL mentorship

The Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) development program, a national youth initiative by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), provides outstanding mentorship opportunities to young beef cattle enthusiasts. The program is geared toward those aged 18-35 interested in developing their industry leadership skills or career potential within the Canadian beef cattle industry. Included in the 16 participants selected for the 2016/17 year was veterinarian student Becky Tees. Continue reading

Bovine TB: understanding the disease and how it is managed in Canada- Webinar March 2

clickheretoregisterThis webinar will provide background information on bovine tuberculosis, including how the bacteria functions, how the disease spreads, and the testing process. Canada’s surveillance program as well as some general biosecurity advice to minimize disease transmission to your operation will also be discussed.

When
6fp2300Thursday March 2,  7:00 pm MST 

  • 6:00pm in BC
  • 7:00pm in AB
  • 8:00pm in SK and MB
  • 9:00pm in ON and QC
  • 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI 

Interested but aren’t available that evening?
Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live event, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too.

Find and register for more BCRC webinars here, including:

  • Managing internal parasites – March 28, 2017
  • Managing native forages – April 6, 2017

Continue reading

Thats’s gotta hurt

This article written by Dr. Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director, originally appeared in the January 2017 issue of Canadian Cattlemen magazine and is reprinted on the BCRC Blog with permission of the publisher.

12_cwcv_IMG_3461Marketing executives for grocery and restaurant chains track consumer perceptions and attitudes towards issues like livestock production practices, animal welfare and pain control. These surveys sometimes lead to initiatives that impose specific production standards on suppliers so the company can distinguish itself and showcase its products.

From the other side, animal welfare researchers study how beef cattle respond to painful procedures like castration, dehorning and branding, and the benefit of providing pain medication. This knowledge is central to updating the science-based Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Beef Cattle.

But what about the producer, who’s responsible for day to day animal care, and who pays for the added costs of any production requirement that is ultimately imposed by law, industry standard, or marketing programs? A better understanding of what motivates (or discourages) producers when it comes to animal care is critical, if new pain control practices are to be adopted.

An upcoming Continue reading