Attention Researchers and Extension Agents: BCRC Opens Two Calls for Letters of Intent



The Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and Alberta Beef Producers (ABP) invite letters of intent (LOIs) for research projects as well as for technology transfer and production economics projects. The application deadline for these separate but concurrent calls is August 7, 2020 at 11:59 PM MT.

The purpose of these two targeted calls is to achieve objectives in the Canadian Beef Research and Technology Transfer Strategy and the National Beef Strategy. These calls are made possible by the recent increase in the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off in most provinces, along with funds provided and administered by ABP. Producer check-off funds allocated to approved projects will need to be leveraged by other industry or government cash contributions. Match leverage funding does not have to be confirmed at the time an LOI is submitted but must be in place prior to BCRC contracting an approved project.

Target outcomes have been clearly defined for both calls through extensive consultation with research teams and industry stakeholders to identify critical needs and key areas where the BCRC and ABP can have the greatest impact. Please refer to the target outcomes listed within the Call for Letters of Intent documents linked below before deciding whether to submit an LOI.

All call-related information can also be found at www.beefresearch.ca on the Forms and Downloads page.

Continue reading

Canadian Cattle Industry – Virtual Town Hall – April 16, 2020



Please join* the NCFA, CCA and Canfax for a Canadian Cattle Industry Virtual Town Hall event happening Thursday, April 16, 2020. Janice Tranberg, President of the National Cattle Feeders Association, Dennis Laycraft, Executive Vice President of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, and Brian Perillat, Manager and Senior Analyst at CanFax will provide updates on the current state of the industry during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following their updates, they will take questions from the audience.

Register Here

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

*Registration will be limited to the first 500 people. A recording of the Town Hall will be available following the event for those unable to attend. Continue reading

More uniform calf crops: Shorter calving seasons can improve the bottom line

For many producers across Canada, calving season has just begun or will soon begin. For other producers this is the time to shift gears into the start of the breeding season. Establishing and maintaining breeding momentum is important. Once a cow is bred in the first part of the breeding season, she has a greater likelihood of breeding back early in the years to follow. Cows that are bred early will have calves that have greater potential to gain by weaning time, resulting in a uniform calf crop and improved profitability.

There is an opportunity for producers to evaluate their calving distribution and the impact it has on their bottom line. Now is a good time for farmers and ranchers to incorporate any changes they want during breeding season, such as when to pull their bulls, that will affect next year’s calf crop.

Each time a cow is not bred during a 21-day heat cycle, it can cost up to 48 lbs of weaning weight (assuming an average daily gain on calves of 2.3 lbs/day). Having more calves born in the first 21 days of the calving season allows producers to market larger, more uniform groups of calves and increase their profit potential. Continue reading

Alternative Feeds: New Web Page



On most cattle operations, feed represents the largest single variable input cost. Livestock producers continually examine ways to reduce this cost and explore options to efficiently and safely feed their livestock. While hay, pasture, other forages and grains make up the largest component of livestock feed, there are many alternative feeds that can supplement and even improve the diet. Cost effective procurement of non-conventional feeds can increase profitability across the operation.

When faced with reduced supplies of good quality hay due to declining production acres and weather events such as late spring frosts, excessive rains or drought, many producers seek alternative feeds for their livestock. While these alternative feed sources can offer flexibility and low-cost options, feed testing and advice from a livestock nutritionist is recommended to ensure nutritional requirements of the type of cattle being fed are being met. Continue reading

Genomics 101 Webinar November 26



DNA is the genetic code that determines how an organism grows, what it looks like, and how it performs in a specific environment. This webinar will discuss how genomics can be used on both purebred and commercial operations.



Registering on your smartphone? After you click ‘I am not a robot’, scroll up until you find the task to complete.

When
Tuesday, November 26th at 7:00 pm MT

  • 6:00pm in BC
  • 7:00pm in AB
  • 8:00pm in SK and MB
  • 9:00pm in ON and QC
  • 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI

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National Beef Strategy sees global opportunities ahead and meets industry challenges head on for 2020-24



News Release

Calgary, AB – The Canadian Beef Advisors are pleased to release the 2020-24 National Beef Strategy. The strategy is designed to take advantage of the opportunities facing the industry while simultaneously addressing the challenges.

The development of the 2020-24 National Strategy has been a dynamic collaborative process engaging all industry sectors and national and provincial organizations. The Canadian Beef Advisors and provincial cattle associations believe a united industry is a stronger industry, and that a stronger industry benefits all those working in it today and into the future.

Substantial progress was made under the 2015-19 strategy and the intention is to continue building on the strengths of existing industry organizations. “The National Beef Strategy has provided real value for Canadian beef producers; it acts as a roadmap for the groups as they work together. We have set our industry up for success, now we just need to follow through.” said David Haywood-Farmer, Past Chair of the Beef Advisors. Continue reading

Government of Saskatchewan 2019 Strategic Research Initiative call for proposals

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture invites collaborative, multi-disciplinary,
cross-institutional Saskatchewan-based teams to develop and submit integrated research proposals that will contribute to the production, management and sustainability of Saskatchewan’s beef industry, pasture and rangeland resources under the diverse
environmental conditions across Saskatchewan.

The goal of the 2019 Strategic Research Initiative is to gather and synthesize knowledge from complementary areas – such as forage breeding, forage management, grazing and livestock management, environmental sustainability and agricultural economics – to develop and refine production advice to improve the productivity, sustainability and competitiveness of Saskatchewan’s forage/beef sector.

Completed applications are due by October 15, 2019.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with Jeff Braidek throughout the development of their proposal. We anticipate that early discussions will help to ensure a strong alignment between the proposed projects and the goals of the program.

Applications must be completed and submitted through the Agriculture Research Branch on-line application system.

To access the application web pages please either Login or create an account (Register) on the following website: https://arb.gov.sk.ca/. Once logged in, please select the Special Projects tab where you will find the Strategic Research Initiative application. Once an application has been created, it can be edited and submitted under this same tab. Should you require any assistance during the application process, please contact Mackenzie Hladun, Database Coordinator with the Ag Research Branch, at Mackenzie.hladun@gov.sk.ca (306-787-5929).

When seeking funding, researchers are encouraged to refer to the priorities and target research outcomes in the Canadian Beef Research and Technology Transfer Strategy.

Johne’s Disease: Cheap to Buy, Costly to Live With

This article written by Dr. Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director, originally appeared in the August 2019 issue of Canadian Cattlemen magazine and is reprinted on the BCRC Blog with permission of the publisher.

“Biosecurity” often conjures up images of poultry or hog operations with truckers-report-at-the-gate signs, shower-in-and-out rules, and workers dressed in hazmat suits. The point of biosecurity practices is obviously to reduce the risk that disease causing microbes will enter or spread within high-health status herds or flocks.

It is much harder to implement high levels of biosecurity in beef operations. I’ve heard a cynic say that biosecurity only prevents diseases that are too big to fit between two strands of barbed wire. I stopped saying that when someone pointed out that most diseases aren’t coming through the fence. Most diseases are bought and paid for and come straight through an open gate along with the newly purchased cattle that are carrying them.

Let’s use Johne’s disease as an example. It’s relatively uncommon in Canadian beef herds but well worth avoiding due to its significant economic costs, animal welfare concerns and impact on the operation’s reputation. Cows with active Johne’s disease can’t absorb nutrients well. This results in chronic diarrhea and loss of body weight and body condition score. As with underfed cows, Johne’s disease results in later rebreeding, lighter calf weaning weights, and losing or culling cows before they have recouped their production costs. Continue reading

Dr. John Campbell receives 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation

Calgary, AB – A leader in beef animal health and welfare has been awarded the 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation. Dr. John Campbell was honored tonight at the 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Conference, held in Calgary, Alberta.


L-R: Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director; Andrea Brocklebank, BCRC Executive Director; Dr. John Campbell, Award Recipient; Ryan Beierbach, BCRC Chair; Steve Hendrick, co-presenter and veterinarian at Coaldale Veterinary Clinic

Dr. Campbell is a professor and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences. His work focuses on clinical research in beef cattle health management and the epidemiology of infectious diseases. He received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 1985 and his Doctor of Veterinary Science in 1991 from the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph.

Dr. Campbell has assisted producers, researchers, veterinarians, and policy makers across Canada with his numerous research projects on infectious diseases, such as respiratory disease and trichomoniasis, and industry-relevant issues, such as antimicrobial resistance and animal welfare. As the Head of the Disease Investigation Unit at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), he has led an effort to keep local veterinarians, provincial officials, and beef producers updated with the information they need to keep their cattle healthy.

Dr. Campbell was responsible for establishing the Western Canadian Cow-Calf Surveillance Network and subsequently the national Canadian Cow-Calf Surveillance Network. Through this network, Dr. Campbell and his colleagues have been able to examine a variety of topics which help scientists from across Canada manage future research projects, identify emerging problems and evolving practices, and support beef producers as they manage production decisions in their herds.

“Dr. John Campbell embodies the spirit of cooperation and communication between academia and the cattle industry,” said Ryan Beierbach, Chair of the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and producer near Whitewood, SK. “He maintains impactful and relevant research by staying actively engaged with cattle producers and is not afraid to get his hands dirty as he digs into the details to solve complex herd health and nutrition problems.” Continue reading