Dr. John Campbell receives 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation

Calgary, AB – A leader in beef animal health and welfare has been awarded the 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation. Dr. John Campbell was honored tonight at the 2019 Canadian Beef Industry Conference, held in Calgary, Alberta.


L-R: Reynold Bergen, BCRC Science Director; Andrea Brocklebank, BCRC Executive Director; Dr. John Campbell, Award Recipient; Ryan Beierbach, BCRC Chair; Steve Hendrick, co-presenter and veterinarian at Coaldale Veterinary Clinic

Dr. Campbell is a professor and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences. His work focuses on clinical research in beef cattle health management and the epidemiology of infectious diseases. He received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine in 1985 and his Doctor of Veterinary Science in 1991 from the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph.

Dr. Campbell has assisted producers, researchers, veterinarians, and policy makers across Canada with his numerous research projects on infectious diseases, such as respiratory disease and trichomoniasis, and industry-relevant issues, such as antimicrobial resistance and animal welfare. As the Head of the Disease Investigation Unit at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM), he has led an effort to keep local veterinarians, provincial officials, and beef producers updated with the information they need to keep their cattle healthy.

Dr. Campbell was responsible for establishing the Western Canadian Cow-Calf Surveillance Network and subsequently the national Canadian Cow-Calf Surveillance Network. Through this network, Dr. Campbell and his colleagues have been able to examine a variety of topics which help scientists from across Canada manage future research projects, identify emerging problems and evolving practices, and support beef producers as they manage production decisions in their herds.

“Dr. John Campbell embodies the spirit of cooperation and communication between academia and the cattle industry,” said Ryan Beierbach, Chair of the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) and producer near Whitewood, SK. “He maintains impactful and relevant research by staying actively engaged with cattle producers and is not afraid to get his hands dirty as he digs into the details to solve complex herd health and nutrition problems.” Continue reading

Beef’s Place in a Healthy Environment: Infographic

Cutting back on the amount of beef Canadians consume has been suggested in the media and public conversations online as a strategy to help save the planet. This recommendation may be based on the erroneous belief that Canadian land is inappropriately or inefficiently used in order to produce beef, but it certainly overlooks the positive impacts that a healthy beef sector has on the environment.

In fact, as you’ll read in the accompanying infographic,:

  • much of the land that cattle graze in Canada cannot be used for other purposes
  • sensitive grasslands, like the endangered Northern Great Plains, and endangered plants, animals and birds can be protected when managed by cattle producers
  • well managed grazing can also restore unproductive soils that have been degraded through improper management
  • most of the plants cattle eat and convert into nutrient-dense meat aren’t edible by humans; they are low quality forage and grains that aren’t high enough quality for human consumption and would otherwise go to waste
  • beef production in Canada provides a unique set of positive environmental and human health impacts that few other food products are capable of

Through the use of technology, innovation and sustainable management practices, Canadian beef producers continue to produce more with less. Research shows that the environmental footprint of Canadian beef production has decreased by more than 15% over the past three decades.

Download our infographic, ‘Beef’s Place in a Healthy Environment’ (PDF, 1396 KB) Continue reading

VBP+ welcomes $602,250 CAP funding to support program advancement



VBP+ NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release
July 12, 2019

The Verified Beef Production Plus (VBP+) program, under the umbrella of the Beef Cattle Research Council, a division of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA), welcomes the investment of $602,250 from the Canadian Agriculture Partnership (CAP) Agri-Assurance program, announced Wednesday by Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Marie-Claude Bibeau.

These funds will be directed to multiple VBP+ activities, including

  • training platform modifications to meet educational demands by producers for continuous improvement in sustainability,
  • increased database capacity and functionality by automating processes where practical and ensuring growing demand is met while adding value and minimizing the cost of the verification process for producers,
  • advancing assessments of equivalency with existing industry programs to provide more value to producers who move through the verification process, and
  • developing a system to determine the impact of training on changes in sustainable production practices.

Continue reading

Cover Crops Webinar March 26


Photo courtesy of Agriculture Agri-Food Canda

Cover crops can have many benefits including improving soil health and prolonging the grazing season. Join this webinar to learn about some of the best practices for growing cover crops.



Registering on your smartphone? After you click ‘I am not a robot’, scroll up until you find the task to complete.

When
Tuesday, March 26 at 7:00 pm MT

  • 6:00pm in BC
  • 7:00pm in AB and SK
  • 8:00pm in MB
  • 9:00pm in ON and QC
  • 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI

Interested but aren’t available that evening?
Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live broadcast, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too.

Duration
Approximately 1 hour.

Jillian Bainard
, Ph.D., is a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada at the Swift Current Research and Development Centre (SCRDC). As a Forage Ecophysiologist, Jillian’s research involves studying forage crops and the interface between plants and their environment. She works with forage breeders, ecologists, and animal scientists to develop forages that are beneficial nutritionally, environmentally, and economically. Jillian completed her PhD in Botany at the University of Guelph in 2011, followed by a postdoc at SCRDC where she studied the use of annual forage polycultures.

 

Cost
BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Technology Transfer project funded by the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster.

What is a webinar?

Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required.

All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy.

As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar.

You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar.

Don’t have high-speed internet? Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.

Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.



Click here to subscribe to the BCRC Blog and receive email notifications when new content is posted.

The sharing or reprinting of BCRC Blog articles is welcome and encouraged. Please provide acknowledgement to the Beef Cattle Research Council, list the website address, www.BeefResearch.ca, and let us know you chose to share the article by emailing us at info@beefresearch.ca.

We welcome your questions, comments and suggestions. Contact us directly or generate public discussion by posting your thoughts below.

Attention researchers: SK Ministry of Agriculture is now accepting Letters of Intent

The Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture is now accepting Letters of Intent (LOI’s) for research funding under the Agriculture Development Fund (ADF).

The Agriculture Development Fund (ADF) was created to fund research to help farmers and ranchers become successful. The core of ADF provides funding for basic and applied agriculture research projects in crops, livestock, forages, processing, soils, environment, horticulture, and alternative crops. It provides project funding of nearly $14 million per year on a competitive basis to researchers in public and private research and development organizations, selected on the basis of their research’s potential to create growth opportunities or enhance the competitiveness of the provincial agriculture industry.

Letters of Intent will be accepted until April 15, 2019.

The Agriculture Development Fund is an online application system. This system is located at: https://arb.gov.sk.ca/ and is best experienced using a modern browser (such as Internet Explorer 11, Google Chrome, or Mozilla Firefox).

More information on the Agriculture Development Fund. 

When seeking funding, researchers are encouraged to refer to the priorities and target research outcomes in the Canadian Beef Research and Technology Transfer Strategy.

Click here to subscribe to the BCRC Blog and receive email notifications when new content is posted.

The sharing or reprinting of BCRC Blog articles is welcome and encouraged. Please provide acknowledgement to the Beef Cattle Research Council, list the website address, www.BeefResearch.ca, and let us know you chose to share the article by emailing us at info@beefresearch.ca.

We welcome your questions, comments and suggestions. Contact us directly or generate public discussion by posting your thoughts below.

What’s in your water? Water quality and the economics of pump systems Webinar March 14

Testing your water sources to ensure it is good quality and free of toxins can help to prevent animal health issues or even death. This webinar will discuss when you should be testing your water, how to do it, what to test for, and what limits are acceptable. We will also talk economics of pumped water systems, running numbers to see how quickly infrastructure to pump water from a dugout will pay for itself.



Registering on your smartphone? After you click ‘I am not a robot’, scroll up until you find the task to complete.

When
Thursday, March 14 at 7:00 pm MT

  • 6:00pm in BC
  • 7:00pm in AB and SK
  • 8:00pm in MB
  • 9:00pm in ON and QC
  • 10:00pm in NS, NB and PEI

Interested but aren’t available that evening?
Register anyway! This webinar will be recorded and posted online at a later date. All registrants will receive a link to the recording and additional learning resources. By attending the live broadcast, you’ll have the opportunity to interact and ask questions too.

Duration
Approximately 1 hour.

Leah Clark is the Livestock Specialist at the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture. Leah has a M.Sc. in agriculture from the University of Saskatchewan, with a major in animal science and a minor in rangeland resources. Her M.Sc. thesis in animal nutrition focuses on wheat-based dried distillers’ grain as a protein and energy source for beef stocker calves in extensive grazing programs. She maintains an active interest in water quality and ruminant nutrition. 



Brenna Grant is the Manager at Canfax Research Services. Brenna monitors data from national statistics; oversees the development of new economic models to make annual outlooks and evaluate the impact of management decisions on cost of production.

Cost
BCRC webinars are available and free of charge thanks to guest speakers who volunteer their time and expertise to support advancements in the Canadian beef industry, and through the Technology Transfer project funded by the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off and Canada’s Beef Science Cluster.

What is a webinar?

Webinars are just like attending a workshop or conference, but from the comfort of your own home or office. We bring the presentation right to you. They’re easy to join and participate in. A reliable, high-speed internet connection is required.

All you need to do is register beforehand, and about 5-10 minutes before the webinar is scheduled to begin, click the link you were provided when you registered. Then turn up your computer speakers or call the phone number provided. That’s it! Sit back and enjoy.

As a participant, you can anonymously answer polls and surveys, and will have the opportunity to ask questions near the end of the webinar.

You can find more beef research-related webinars hosted by other organizations on our events calendar.

Don’t have high-speed internet? Consider calling a neighbor that does and watch the webinar together, or call your regional ag office to ask whether arranging a group viewing is possible.

Visit our Webinars page to find other upcoming BCRC webinars and the recordings of our past sessions.



Click here to subscribe to the BCRC Blog and receive email notifications when new content is posted.

The sharing or reprinting of BCRC Blog articles is welcome and encouraged. Please provide acknowledgement to the Beef Cattle Research Council, list the website address, www.BeefResearch.ca, and let us know you chose to share the article by emailing us at info@beefresearch.ca.

We welcome your questions, comments and suggestions. Contact us directly or generate public discussion by posting your thoughts below.

Applications open for the Beef Researcher Mentorship Program

Applications for the 2019-20 term of the BCRC Beef Researcher Mentorship Program are now being accepted.  The deadline to apply is May 1, 2019.

Four researchers were selected to participate in the program this past year. Each was paired with two mentors – an innovative producer and another industry expert – for a one year term (ending July 31, 2019). Each of the researchers have reported very successful and valuable experiences through the opportunities provided, including:

    • Establishing partnerships with industry and other researchers to further their research programs
    • Meeting several producers and industry leaders with whom they ask questions and have meaningful discussions about cattle production, beef quality and safety, and the Canadian beef value chain
    • Attending industry events and touring farms and ranches to better understand the impacts, practicalities and economics of adopting research results

The BCRC is excited to continue the program and invite applications from upcoming and new applied researchers in Canada whose studies are of value to the beef industry, such as cattle health and welfare, beef quality, food safety, genetics, feed efficiency, or forages. A new group of participants will begin their mentorships on August 1st.

The Beef Researcher Mentorship Program launched in August 2014 to facilitate greater engagement of upcoming and new applied researchers with Canada’s beef industry.

Learn more about the program and **download an application form at: http://www.beefresearch.ca/about/mentorship-program.cfm**

Continue reading

Bull Selection: New Calculator to Determine the Value of a Bull

Editor’s note: The following is part four of a four-part series that helps you to evaluate different breeding programs, which bulls are optimal for your herd, and how much they’re worth. (See part onepart two and part three).

Different traits of bulls can contribute to different impacts on the bottom line of the operation. For example, a bull with a higher calving ease EPD may contribute to more live calves. Not surprisingly, bulls with higher calving ease (or lower birth weights) sell for a higher price (Simms et al., 1997). With the large variation in bulls available, bull prices extend over a wide range from $3,000 to over $20,000 per head.

Identifying a fair price during sire selection contributes to higher efficiency in operation economics. To estimate breakeven bull price, a bull valuation calculator has been developed. The purpose is to provide a general idea of how much a bull is worth based on key farm parameters.

Bull Values – two Scenarios

The value a bull provides depends on his individual performance, the environment (ex: pasture productivity), management (cow:bull ratio) and markets (calf price). For example, large framed bulls require more feed, leading to a higher maintenance cost, but that may be offset by heavier calves at sale time.

Two scenarios were studied – a low maintenance farm versus a high maintenance farm. Table 1 shows the parameters entered for each farm. The default values in the calculator are the averages of the two scenarios. Continue reading

How much water is used to make a pound of beef?

Facts about water use and other environmental impacts of beef production in Canada

Yes, it takes water to produce beef, but in the 2.5 million years since our ancestors started eating meat, we haven’t lost a drop yet.

Based on the most recent science and extensive calculations of a wide range of factors, it is estimated that the pasture-to-plate journey of this important protein source requires about 1,910 US gallons per pound (or 15,944 litres per kilogram) of water to get Canadian beef to the dinner table. That’s what is known as the “water footprint” of beef production.

That may sound like a lot, but the fact is it doesn’t matter what crop or animal is being produced; food production takes water. Sometimes it sounds like a lot of water, but water that is used to produce a feed crop or cattle is not lost. Water is recycled – sometimes in a very complex biological process— and it all comes back to be used again. Continue reading

Nominate an outstanding researcher by May 1



The Canadian Beef Industry Award for Outstanding Research and Innovation is presented by the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) each year to recognize a researcher or scientist whose work has contributed to advancements in the competitiveness and sustainability of the Canadian beef industry.

Nominations are welcome from all stakeholders of the Canadian beef industry and will be reviewed by a selection committee comprised of beef producers, industry experts and retired beef-related researchers located across the country. Continue reading